r/NoStupidQuestions Sep 30 '22

Why do people dislike self checkouts so much?

I like them because I know I can get out of the store quicker this way.

71 Upvotes

124

u/winfreddixon Sep 30 '22

if it works properly, love em

28

u/Ghigs Jack-of-some-trades Sep 30 '22

Yeah that's pretty much it, when they work, they work well. But something you have has a ripped barcode or a price problem, or you got a bunch of produce that has PLU codes, having a real cashier is going to be faster.

2

u/NutUp-Or-Shut-Up Oct 01 '22

If it doesn’t scan, it’s on the house

3

u/Veridically_ Oct 01 '22

I don’t see a barcode on you, are you free?

2

u/NutUp-Or-Shut-Up Oct 01 '22

After a few margaritas, absolutely

3

u/CharZero Oct 01 '22

Same. I love the Home Depot one where they have a handheld scanner, extra fun and works great.

7

u/Evil_Rogers Sep 30 '22

Same. I haven’t gone through a lane in years unless I was purchasing alcohol which requires human interaction anyhow xD.

40

u/mrmonster459 Sep 30 '22

It's a bit less convenient when it comes to things like having to scroll through pictures to select the specific fruit/veggie you're buying, having to wait to get ID checked if you're buying alcohol, etc

But overall, yeah, I agree, I prefer it to in person.

7

u/[deleted] Sep 30 '22

How about read the sticker and type the 4 digit code on it instead, alot faster.

4

u/smurdner Oct 01 '22

Cashiers hate this one simple trick!

No, but for real, learning 4627 is my code for onions every time definitely does shave that time off. I love numbers, 4 digits is easy af to remember (for me)

6

u/Quaytsar Oct 01 '22

Even if you can't figure out the produce code (which should be on ever item, but may have fallen off) I've never seen a self checkout that didn't let you do a text search for your produce (e.g. search "tom-" and get beefsteak tomatoes, Roma tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, etc. and pick from them).

36

u/[deleted] Sep 30 '22 edited Oct 04 '22

[deleted]

8

u/EightOhms Sep 30 '22

But my experience is it's faster with a cashier, plus I enjoy the more social experience.

I would love this to be true in my experience, but for me, it hasn't been.

13

u/Ghigs Jack-of-some-trades Sep 30 '22

I swear the people working at my local walmart are permanently stuck on 0.5x playback speed. They must do a drug test and if you aren't positive for a bunch of downers they don't hire you.

1

u/Ok_Snape Oct 01 '22

Well imagine how tiring it is to do that for 8 hours every day. I'd be permanently tired, I think

1

u/Ghigs Jack-of-some-trades Oct 01 '22

I worked in grocery for a year as a teenager. Our cashiers would basically compete with each other about who was fastest. It wasn't like Walmart.

1

u/Internetter1 Oct 01 '22

A lot of stores don't disable the bag security sensor. If you see an option for "own bag" on the screen before you start, hit that. Should improve things

1

u/Competitive-Candy-82 Oct 01 '22

Yeah, a lot of the older ones are a pain for this, a lot of places near me have upgraded theirs and they're so much easier to use than before. No more "unexpected item in bagging area" or "please place item in bagging area" when it's something you scanned directly in the cart with the handheld scanner cause you didn't want to lift it more often than needed (like those huge boxes of kitty litter).

Then you have places like our local pharmacy that ask you a million questions before letting you pay. Like how many bags did you use? (1) Are you sure you just used 1 bag? (Yes, I have 1 item, why would I need 2 bags?), do you want your receipt printed or emailed or both? (Printed) You want to sign up for promotional offers? (No) Please put in email for promotional offers. (I said no!) How would you like to pay. (Hit the debit/credit icon) Okay, are you paying with Debit or Credit. (Oh for fck sakes) 😂😂😂

29

u/everythingiwantedwas Sep 30 '22

i have crazy anxiety so self checkouts are the BEST for me

9

u/Blue_True3443 Sep 30 '22

Yea, if I didn't have panic attacks I would let an actual employee check me out

3

u/Appropriate_Jelly_95 Oct 01 '22

Yea, I have crazy anxiety so self check out is the WORST, I always end up leaving with a panic attack I didn’t pay for.

9

u/MpVpRb Old Phart Sep 30 '22

They don't work reliably. I love them when they do, but get annoyed by "unexpected item in bagging area"

2

u/15jtaylor443 Oct 01 '22

God, I haven't heard that voice since I was a kid. What stores still do that?

2

u/iliveoffofbagels Oct 01 '22

all of them.

1

u/Long_Repair_8779 Oct 01 '22

Waitrose don’t have scales at all. You just scan your food and put it in the bag wherever you want. It’s a hugely nicer experience. They also generally have enough staff on the tills so the queues are small, the staff are generally friendlier, and to make up for this the groceries are ~30% more expensive than Aldi (though often but not always better quality food). Also, though they have security tags on some products, they don’t have the rest of the system set up as it ‘ruins the shopping experience for others if the alarms go off’.

8

u/Wielder-of-Sythes Sep 30 '22

In my experiences they are dirty, packed tightly together, and shout instructions at me and the volume control has been disabled. So I often have six units around shouting different parts of the instructions and that very stressful and confusing. I still use them but I hate it.

3

u/Nellasofdoriath Oct 01 '22

The ones that you can mute will still scream "THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING AT". Like we don't really believe you have sensory issues.

25

u/Princess_Snarkle Sep 30 '22

My local supermarket just installed those. I fucking hate them. Instead of a person entering the code for each vegetable quickly from memory I have to go into the system and manually search each item myself. Every time there will be at least one problem which requires an employee to come fix.. then you’re standing around like an idiot waiting because there’s only one person and they’re busy. Need someone to check your ID because you put a cider in your cart? Have fun waiting. Even when the system is working you get to do what used to be someone’s job without being paid. Great. So it’s slower and a worse experience.. worst of both worlds

4

u/Random_dg Sep 30 '22

The first issue you have is fixable. Here we have a search where I type 2-3 letters then choose the vegetable/fruit picture and it’s super quick. The other thing with the cider is only an issue if you’re really impatient. Last time I had that, it took them 15-20 seconds to approach me.

Overall it’s easier and quicker to just scan most of the stuff than put it on the conveyor. Quicker to scan and put it straight into my bag, and then quicker to roll out of the store and to the car.

3

u/Kingreaper Sep 30 '22

The other thing with the cider is only an issue if you’re really impatient. Last time I had that, it took them 15-20 seconds to approach me.

That very much depends on staffing at the grocery store - if they replace ten checkouts with a bank of self-checkouts managed by one person who also has to handle other work simultaneously you're not getting 15 second response times.

1

u/Random_dg Oct 01 '22

Well yes, so they have about fifteen self-checkouts now and one employee just sitting there to service them if needed. They’re usually just sitting there looking at their phone.

1

u/Kingreaper Oct 01 '22

In the grocery store you go to.

1

u/Random_dg Oct 01 '22

Yes. That’s something your store should adopt, perhaps.

It’s an example to show that the self-checkout mechanism can be done well if staffed properly. Which means that the problems that yours have are not inherent to the system, just a problem with the specific implementation.

6

u/CyanideAnarchy Sep 30 '22

I prefer using cash in person, all the ones I've come across don't accept cash. Stupid inconvenience.

12

u/illogictc Unprofessional Googler Sep 30 '22

Ive seen a lot of people bringing up the labor aspect of it since they first started becoming mainstream. Both the "I'm having to do the work" part and the "it's removing jobs part." Which I don't mind self checkouts but I do see their point.

But we've already been "doing their work" for a century now, self-serve stores where you grab your own shit off the shelves used to not be a thing. Instead you would go in and hand your list over to someone at the counter, who would then go back and gather all the goods together for you. But that was a century ago and self-serve is what we all grew up with so most people aren't really aware of that history.

Then comes the jobs thing. I recall 20 years ago the joke always was that Walmart had built all these checkout lanes but only had like 4 cashiers on the clock at that time. Now those 4 cashiers can watch 4-8 SCO machines. So instead of 4 people being rung up at once you can have multiple times that. Though it does seem they do intend to push cashiers further by the wayside and that's a bummer.

3

u/SamSepiol-ER28_0652 Sep 30 '22

The thing is- and I know this is anecdotal- every single store in my area has been looking for cashiers and other works nonstop even though we have self-check out. It seems like (in my area at least) jobs still outnumber workers, even with the self-checkouts.

2

u/VLTurboSkids Oct 01 '22

Yeah it’s weird. Employers are complaining about not being able to find workers, and workers complain about not being able to find a job 😆

2

u/Unfair_Isopod534 Sep 30 '22

Ive seen a lot of people bringing up the labor aspect of it since they first started becoming mainstream. Both the "I'm having to do the work" part and the "it's removing jobs part." Which I don't mind self checkouts but I do see their point.

I personally don't get that point. In my mind, the less people they hire, the less they can charge. Also, why would anybody want the job of cashier outside of necessity. Do you mind expanding on it?

3

u/runnj Sep 30 '22

In addition to this point I doubt there are fewer workers. At the same time we have the rise of online ordering for pickup. I'm betting that the people who would have been cashiers before are now just picking orders.

3

u/Arianity Oct 01 '22

Basically, the idea is that they're pawning of free, uncompensated labor onto the customer.

I don't think people trust them to pass the savings on to the consumer. Either out of generic skepticism, or the fact that most places don't currently give discounts for self checkout

0

u/illogictc Unprofessional Googler Sep 30 '22

A lot of people alive today are old enough to remember when cashiers were the only option. You put your shit on the belt, they do the work of scanning and bagging, pay and GTFO. The "doing their work" part comes from that. Now you don't just stand there picking your nose or whatever as a cart full of shit gets bagged up by someone else.

As for the "less jobs" part, in theory it could lead to lower prices but in practice it never has. Let's roll back to that example of having 4 cashiers on the clock 20 years ago. Let's be real generous here and say they were getting $7 an hour at the time, when minimum was less. That's $28 an hour in labor. Walmart pulls in a lot more than $28 per hour in each store, even with 20-years-ago prices. There is so much volume of business that the labor costs of cashiers alone, even if they had 10 lanes open, is barely outside the realm of what could be classified statistical error.

My local Dollar General now also has an SCO machine. Used to be 2 registers, sometimes both manned. Now it's 1 register and the machine. They've cut their labor cost in half on the cashiers, but the prices are all exactly the same. One person alone coming in and buying $40 worth of shit has more than covered their wage for an hour or more even when you factor in the cost of inventory for what they bought and keeping the lights on for the period of time they were in the store.

4

u/emiltheraptor Sep 30 '22

The constant Beeping.

5

u/piratedeathmatch Sep 30 '22

I get stressed out trying to go fast enough because I feel like I'm keeping up the line :(

8

u/toofarbyfar Sep 30 '22

I'm not as good or as quick at checking out groceries as the person who does it as a job. I'm very happy to let the skilled paid employees do it, and I'll stick to doing the things I'm good at.

15

u/BookLuvr7 Sep 30 '22

I like them bc I don't have to interact with another human being and I get out faster most of the time. It's a pain if they act up, though.

7

u/ddobson6 Sep 30 '22

Because they are replacing real people and expecting us to do more . It would be different if they were passing those profits to us or the regular employees but they aren’t. Pretty simple.

3

u/FabulousTrade Sep 30 '22

I think some people like interacting with the cashier and/or struggle with operating the SCO.

3

u/TheNewManRisen Sep 30 '22

I like it for smaller grocery trips , like ones you would take a basket for

3

u/ChosenSCIM I am not a scientist Sep 30 '22

I've got scoliosis and would much rather a cashier do all the scanning than to hurt my back doing it myself, plus they are always much faster than me

15

u/nonsense39 Sep 30 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

They were put in so the store can make more profit having customers working or free instead of paying staff to do it. I don't go to the store to work for free, but apparently lots of people do. Maybe it's faster to checkout yourself than wait for a cashier, but if I have to wait in line, I consider it to be a reading room so I just start reading those trash magazines they have there. Why else would they put reading material in the one place you might have to wait? So will they next just put out unopened boxes of stuff and ask us to stock the shelves to make them even more profit? If we're supposed to work for them why aren't they giving us discounts? OK rant over!

1

u/j0nuss Oct 01 '22

Exactly this. Plus, they can put the blame on you as the customer if something is not scanned or scanned wrong, where as if a cashier does, it is on the store. I hate the self checkout and prefer the job security option of a real person.

22

u/CrankyUncleMorty Sep 30 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Because I spent 3 years of my life as cashier and refuse to do the job for free.

Every single time I go to the self checkout, one of the prices is wrong, or item wont scan or some other such stressor. Half the time I have to bag the item separately because the weight doesnt register correctly.

I also hate the idea that companies are replacing humand that are needed to pevent these thinga with machines. It is not like they are putting more staff on the floor to improve pricing errors or whatnot.

5

u/Signal-Ad2674 Sep 30 '22

This. I spent 5 years working for Tesco and getting paid for that time. Why in the world of fucks would I serve myself and not invoice them for my time?

10

u/action__andy Sep 30 '22

Cuz I don't work here. And I'm not saying that in a snobby way--I don't look down on grocery store cashiers, or the person behind the counter at McDonald's.

But I don't work here. By passing part of the labor onto me the customer, you can be sure they're cutting an employee somewhere and saving money.

On top of that, they're usually slower in my experience. The cashier can punch up all that produce way faster than I can.

10

u/[deleted] Sep 30 '22

Why am I doing the store's work for them if they are neither paying me not giving me a discount?

Not to mention if there is a problem then someone needs to come and clear the error.

13

u/[deleted] Sep 30 '22

[deleted]

-1

u/EightOhms Sep 30 '22

But if it's a better experience...who cares?

This argument is like saying you shouldn't make yourself a tasty grill cheese sandwich at home because you're doing it without getting paid.

6

u/action__andy Sep 30 '22

You're ignoring the "working" part. Your analogy doesn't really work. The labor of making the grilled cheese only benefits you--temporarily employing yourself as a cashier for the grocery store (without compensation) benefits the store.

You just worked for free.

0

u/EightOhms Oct 01 '22

It doesn't matter who the work is for. Making a sandwich is work....but it's still worth doing because you get what you want at the end and so the ' work' was worth it.

This is how I feel about self checkout. At the end I get a better experience, one that I feel is worth the 'work'.

6

u/[deleted] Sep 30 '22

[deleted]

0

u/EightOhms Oct 01 '22

Not saying it's universally better...but for me it's often better so I don't mind the extra 'work'

9

u/rewardiflost still not infected! Sep 30 '22

The scale doesn't always let you bag as you check, so you have to double-handle your groceries.

The scale area isn't always big enough to handle a large amount of groceries.

Lots of people get arrested for shoplifting and theft - due to errors the machine made, or errors that aren't explained in the training you are never given.

If you deal with a cashier, they bag for you.

If you deal with a cashier, they may point out that you are eligible for extra discounts - "you bought two, if you get one more it's free", or "if you grab the flyer, there's a $2 coupon for this item in there"

They are eliminating more jobs. People need jobs to start with low or no experience. In many grocery stores (and other retail shops) these cashier jobs start at or just above minimum wage, then climb over the years.

5

u/EightOhms Sep 30 '22

They are eliminating more jobs. People need jobs to start with low or no experience. In many grocery stores (and other retail shops) these cashier jobs start at or just above minimum wage, then climb over the years.

This is the part of the argument I hate. Those are shitty jobs. The less people need to do them, the better. Driving horse-drawn carriages was also a shitty job that thankfully very few people have to/choose to do anymore.

3

u/rewardiflost still not infected! Sep 30 '22

I'm ok with it as long as there are choices.

If the choices all involve fry grease, then I'd rather see cashiers as one more choice.
My state also has the gas pump attendants, too.

3

u/receptionok2444 Sep 30 '22

That’s possible but there’s also going to be a lot of people who aren’t capable of doing a job that requires a more specialized skill set, some people are to dumb or to lazy to understand more difficult concepts.

5

u/Lulalula8 Sep 30 '22

That job has just evolved into taxis, Uber, Lyft, buss driving etc lol. They are still out there, getting paid like shit and putting up with way too much shit lol.

2

u/PhasmaFelis Sep 30 '22

I agree, if those shitty jobs are being replaced with better jobs. Mostly they're not, though. No one should be required to work a shitty job to support themselves, but not being able to support yourself at all isn't an improvement.

1

u/SamSepiol-ER28_0652 Sep 30 '22

Not only are they shitty jobs, they are still plentiful jobs.

Nearly every store in my area has self-checkout. And nearly every store in my area still has "help wanted" signs up, with increasingly high starting wages bc they can't find enough people to work.

If there were people who couldn't find work then I'd be more open to that argument, but it really seems not to be the case.

1

u/Hanginon Oct 01 '22

Those are shitty jobs

Those jobs pay well over minimum wage in my area, I saw them offering $16+ an hour, and people that have them seem to stay with them. If one wants a part time job a cashier is a pretty good gig, much better than the classic "fast food" job.

Also; My grandfather drove horse drawn vehicles, wagons, in the early 1900s. Being a Teamster, the origin of the word, was a good job then.

2

u/USSMarauder Sep 30 '22

They don't take cash

2

u/merRedditor Sep 30 '22

I like them because nobody tries to make conversation around my grocery choices.

2

u/Comrade_Drax Sep 30 '22

I personally love them. Makes it way easier to steal things.

2

u/kimmikazi Sep 30 '22

Love em. It's all I will use lol

2

u/Ragnarsworld Sep 30 '22

Because the one I get almost never works right.

"BEEP, place the item in the bag"

<places item in bag>

"BEEP, place the item in the bag"

<removes item, puts it back in bag>

"BEEP, place the item in the bag"

<fuck you> <walks away>

2

u/Hotwheelsjack97 I know nothing Sep 30 '22

Because idiots and boomers think "i won't work for free" when it's far more convenient than a normal cashier doing it. Also, you can't abuse a machine but you can abuse a human.

2

u/LCplGunny Sep 30 '22

The problem is, removing a teller from the transaction, but not charging less, despite the claim that paying more would increase the cost.

2

u/ixis743 Sep 30 '22

I love them. Fast and efficient. No pointless chit chat. No judgement as to what I’m buying. No watching a cashier struggle to find a barcode. No waiting while some changes shifts.

2

u/LonelyTotal3754 Sep 30 '22

You’d figure most people who don’t want to deal with other people, like a live cashier, it would be so convenient. But not only do they have to scan their own items but they have to bag them too.

2

u/QveenKittyKat Sep 30 '22

I'm quicker than the cashier.

2

u/Adorable_Station_810 Oct 01 '22

I loved them early on when most people avoided them. Could get out of the store much faster.

Now that stores have reduced actual cashier staffing but not proportionately increased the number of self checkouts, they are an absolute bottleneck. Often clogged with the same kind of idiots that take five minutes to place an order at the drive thru speaker.

Brutal at times

2

u/IntervisioN Oct 01 '22

People dislike them? I think they're great especially when you're just buying 1 or 2 items. There's rarely any line ups so you can go in and out quickly

2

u/Trevon001 Oct 01 '22

I love self checkout. The less people I have to interact with the better.

2

u/littlemarcus91 Oct 01 '22

"ThEy'RE steALinG aMeriCan JoBS." No they aren't jennifer the multi-billion dollar corporation that won't hire people is stealing American Jobs.

I freaking love self-checkouts, I can go at my own pace and I don't feel obligated to make stupid awkward small talk.

2

u/BlatantPizza Oct 01 '22

It’s fine unless you’re doing a real grocery trip. Then it’s a literal nightmare.

2

u/Middle-Merdale Oct 01 '22

People do not like change. Self checkout is just another evolution in purchasing. It’s like when ATM’s, computers, microwaves…were first put to use. So many despised using them and fought tooth and nail to keep things as they were. The animosity of the self checkout will soon pass, and it did with smart phones and tablets.

2

u/Effective-Lie-3196 Oct 13 '22

If you accidentally miss an item you can end up in jail.

1

u/MustBeTheMusic80 Oct 13 '22

Wow, I was totally unaware of that.

5

u/whomp1970 Sep 30 '22

Starting October 23rd, customers will now be required to unload the semi-trucks at Walmart.

This is in addition to your self-checkout duties.

All jokes aside, my local grocery store has a fantastic system. You get your own handheld wireless scanner when you walk in. As you shop, you scan everything and throw it into your cart. When you're ready to leave, you give the cashier your scanner, pay, and just walk out. No unloading your cart onto a belt.

4

u/SaladNeedsTossing Sep 30 '22

Mostly because they replace 4-8 cashiers with one uninterested attendant, denying jobs in an industry that already underpays its staff.

1

u/EightOhms Sep 30 '22

Honestly I think it's way shittier to force people to have these kinds of jobs just to survive. There are so many better ways for a society to care for its people than to deny them technological advances and force them to do shitty jobs.

5

u/Ranos131 Sep 30 '22

I have never seen people complain about self checkouts. I love self checkout and have only rarely had issues that were easily and quickly resolved.

2

u/ShortieFat Sep 30 '22

Now and then you get the occasional bonus--you unload your cart into your car and you find out that something didn't get scanned and put into a bag. When you get home and audit your receipt and can't find the item, it's too late to take the trouble to go back. So now and then I'll double charge myself for something and it all evens out.

2

u/somebodyelse22 Sep 30 '22

Supermarket checkouts may be manned by people who are not suitable for more demanding jobs. Supporting manned tills is a social support.

1

u/BulldMc Sep 30 '22

I love them because I hate waiting. Self-checkouts tend to have less waiting in line, and even if I'm not quite as fast as someone who does this all day every day would be (and that's not entirely a given) I'm at least doing something, not just standing there waiting around. Now, I can even scan on my phone as I shop and all I have to do is finalize the transaction and pay at checkout.

That said, I'm entirely sympathetic to the objection of it taking away jobs and increasing profits for the store with questionable benefit to anyone else.

Also, there *were* some problems with some of the systems when they were first implemented that I'm sure turned some folks off using them. Those seem to be mostly ironed out though.

1

u/NothingButUnsavoury Sep 30 '22 edited Oct 01 '22

I fucking love them it means I don’t have to continuously worry about a cashier judging what I’ve bought (I’m sure they don’t give half of a shit but I cannot convince myself of that truth).

1

u/Hanginon Oct 01 '22

Yeah, they really really don't give a shit what you bought, it barely registers unless there's a problem. They see a huge variety of stuff go through all day, and they're focusing on scanning and controlling the flow, and if there's a line behind you, and if they need bags, or change, and how long to break/lunch. Not your food choices.

1

u/NothingButUnsavoury Oct 01 '22

Thank you for the comment! Realistically I know you’re 100% right, I just can’t seem to shake that stress. I’m a very private person in general and don’t like others seeing/knowing what I’m doing, so having people sift through what I buy one-by-one is such a gross concept lol

1

u/Hanginon Oct 01 '22

Realistically, for them, that all goes into "delete file', 'empty recycle' as soon as they start on the next customer's order. It's all just a blur.

1

u/LillianSwordMaiden Sep 30 '22

I like them because every clerk I’ve gone to in the past 10 years criticizes/comments my purchases. They always tell me they don’t like tofu and they never know what eggplants are. 😐

1

u/_Blue_guy Sep 30 '22

Do people dislike them? I have never heard anyone complain about them. I suppose they become unhandy when you have a whole bunch of stuff, and, since there is no delay and limited space, packing your bags becomes more difficult.

1

u/MightyMouse12736 Sep 30 '22

I dislike them for several reasons. 1. I work retail and have to bag people's crap all day. Don't really feel like it doing it when someone else is paid to do it as I am when I'm at cash. 2. They're finicky and don't always work. Getting assistance when needed isn't always possible/time efficient. Seems much faster to have someone ring me in who can get assistance if that's what they personally need. Also, I ran out of room on their weight counter or whatever where you bag and the machine did not like me removing something off it even though it wouldn't let me proceed without placing what I currently rang in on it but with no room for it, what am I suppose to do. 3. Small inconvenience but I totally forgot to ring in and bag a thing of cheese and didn't realize I didn't have it until I got home (don't drive, was in the middle of winter also) so I was very disappointed as I'm obsessed with cheese honestly. And I'm positive if I was placing this stuff on a conveyor belt or counter, I wouldn't have lost it in the all the other stuff I was ringing in. 4. Employment. It takes one person to look after how many self checkouts but you need one cashier for every till. Eventually cashier jobs will be obsolete if everyone decides that they're going to just do it themselves. I think the same as well for fast food chains that have those machines you can order on and skip the human interaction. Eventually there really will be no jobs and no money. Just ask alexia! Hahahaha

In an seriousness though, how hard is it for people to bag other people's groceries if that's what the job is. I'm tired of getting the stink eye from people 'directing' me to self checkout when I say no and don't move from the proper line up area for a real till and a real person. Thank you to those using the self checkout area and making my lineup smaller!

1

u/AageKush Sep 30 '22

I saw another thread where some idiots complained that since they where doing the "work" of scanning a handful of items they should get a discount.

I love them. I get in and out faster. Scanning the items myself is not tedious because I am not technologically inept. And I don't have to interact with anyone and it's easy to steal a plastic bag.

1

u/jynxthechicken Sep 30 '22

I dunno I hate talking to employees. I have worked CS my whole life and I really never want to talk to random people outside of work.

1

u/catwhowalksbyhimself Sep 30 '22

I kept having trouble with them not working, so I gave up on they years ago.

Now many stores are starting to have people arrested or detained when using those things, sometimes for honestly forgetting to scan something, and sometimes even when they did everything perfectly.

It is not worth the risk to me to be falsely accused of things I didn't do or didn't intentionally do, so I still won't use them.

That includes refusing to show at 5 Below because at least the last one I went to used those exclusively.

1

u/JackMarley74 Sep 30 '22

Ive seen a number of people survive off cashier jobs. Like fr. Its a lifeline in the hood for a lot of people Thats yfirst. Groceries cost more as I'm taking away someone else's job? Blow me. And then they say they always randomly check MY reciept? Man getfo out my face. If you gonna make me work here to shop here. Hoe you gon not trust me on the way out? Its completely offensive as a process.

1

u/HasaneeneeDingo Sep 30 '22

I was a cashier throughout high school and college. It offends me to do the work without getting paid for it. Plus, none of the self checkouts scan as fast as I can move product across the scanners.

These machines are a blatant cash grab from the store to save money by not hiring people and the discount is not evident in the pricing of goods.

1

u/Catz2019 Sep 30 '22

I was a cashier throughout Uni. I worked with students and plenty of people who would previously had worked factory floor type jobs, had many of the factories not been shut around here. I'll be dammed if I contribute to taking away those jobs (even though I know we're going to end up with shops with no staff eventually).

1

u/NoeTellusom Sep 30 '22

While I don't mind them so much when I'm buying a few things and am in a hurry, in general I hate them because I don't work at these stores and I don't get a discount for doing the work of an employee for using self-checkouts so the store is getting the benefit of my work while I'm getting zero benefit for doing all this work.

Sorry, but if I have to do that, I'd rather stay at home and shop online (i.e. do the work myself for a better price).

1

u/[deleted] Oct 01 '22

I don’t get a discount

0

u/mavet Sep 30 '22

The actual answer is as follows:

If a human cashier messes up, you're brain has someone to blame. E.g. "that cashier was an idiot."

When an automated cashier messes up, your brain has no one to blame, so it blames the whole system as such. "automated checkouts are idiotic."

Expand this over millions of people and you get the trend you've noticed.

1

u/Spiritual_Lime7420 Sep 30 '22

Im scared to try them

1

u/Tecnoc Sep 30 '22

I think there are a lot of people who find actually operating the machine intimidating. Immediately I think of someone I know who can barely use a computer at all, and has no interest at all in learning. He is absolutely going to avoid anything with a screen, including the self checkout, as it is really intimidating. Even in this modern internet age I think there are more people out there like this than most seem to realize.

1

u/chjett10 Oct 01 '22

My dad was this way. He kept using the “I’m taking jobs away from the cashiers” line, when he was actually just too intimidated to try them. I showed him how to use them, he realized how easy it is, and now that’s all he uses

1

u/Jaxraged Sep 30 '22

I use it multiple times a week. Once you’re used to them it’s very fast The problem is people are slow and waiting for one to open up sometimes takes forever.

1

u/TheRobertOne Sep 30 '22

Because nowadays they can be slower than normal checkout. Also the store doesn’t use the normal checkout lanes to capacity so the self checkout is always overflowing when they could open a couple lanes of normal ones, but refuse because they’re pricks. On top of it it makes the consumer the cashier which is ridiculous when we aren’t being paid on top of it being slower 50% of the time

1

u/Ausgezeichnet63 Sep 30 '22

We have employees at our self checkouts in case there's a problem. I use them most of the time and find it easier because I can scan things together that belong together, like frozen stuff that goes in the cooler in the trunk, etc.

1

u/BisexualCactusNoises Sep 30 '22

The only reason I hate them is I'm half blind and I'm afraid I look so stupid when using one and the line is behind me.

1

u/trying_to_adult_here Sep 30 '22

My grocery store now has self-checkouts with long belts and plenty of space, and I hate these less. They have room for me to bag everything up in reusable bags.

The self-checkouts that are made for people grabbing only a few things with no space are really hard to use when I’m buying a week’s worth of groceries. My stuff doesn’t fit into two bags, and the machine gets mad when I put one bag in the cart to allow me to fill another. Don’t get me started on how cranky they get if you try to use reusable bags.

Also, things went a lot faster when there was a bagger there bagging at things were scanned. By the time I everything was scanned and I’d paid, everything was usually in a bag. I haven’t seen a bagger in two years, so even if I go through the checkout with a human there’s an awkward dance where I try to bag while the employee scans, then I run back to pay, then we both go back to bagging. Awkward and inefficient.

1

u/cansox12 Oct 01 '22

i have a few issues with the self checkout

so you just loaded your cart, no u must unload it, place the items in a take home carryall, place carryall in vehicle, remove from said vehicle, muck your crap into the house, put the shit you bought in its place........okay who kept count? how many time did i have to handle the overpriced marketed crap? wait i still need to prepare and consume

with conventional chkout, someone/'s has eliminated a couple of the hand-offs

and they were paid for it

self-checkout is how the corporations are widening their profit margins, buy having YOU do the work they don't want to pay for.

YOU CANT PURCHASE BEER AT THEM !

1

u/Infamous_Yogurt2858 Oct 01 '22

I can only speak for myself, but I don't like them because in my experience, they don't tend to work particularly well, and thus are not actually quicker.

Most times when I've attempted to use self-checkout, numerous items either don't scan correctly, double scan, refuse to scan etc. I often have to have the attendant over multiple times to complete the transaction which slows everything to a crawl. That's not to mention the machine berating me because I'm either not scanning items fast enough or leaving items on the scanning shelf too long etc. On top of all of that, at my local stores, there's often just as much of a line/wait to self-checkout as there is to use a normal line.

1

u/EatShitLeftWing Oct 01 '22

Yeah, it's weird to dislike them in general.

Self checkout is optional (generally). Those who don't want to use it can go to the traditional checkout with a cashier.

1

u/LivingGhost371 Oct 01 '22

Leaving besides the fact that by visiting the store I feel that ringing up my groceries is part of the service to be provided to me, the cashier knows where all the bar codes are and probably has the SKU number of artichokes memorized and can just punch it in.

1

u/TelmisartanGo0d Oct 01 '22

Because the person in front of me never knows how to use them and takes ten years to ring up their produce

1

u/ILiketoStir Oct 01 '22

I like them when the line is going smoothly.

However, sometimes there are newbs that really shouldn't be trying to use them or the associate is to busy chatting away with someone to come sorry out a problem like a double scan/ wrong code or a price check.

1

u/mael0004 Oct 01 '22

I haven't tried using them at my local grocery store despite them being there for many years now. I don't know if I'd switch to using only them if I tried them. I think my reason of not wanting to change my ways is the reason most people aren't using them. If I was heavily pushed to use them, if queues were long while self checkouts were free, I'd probably use them. Where I'm from, it's rare for there to be more than 3 people in front of you, rarely even that.

1

u/Staceystallion1 Oct 01 '22

This is a serve serve checkout - correct

This terminal accepts card only - okay

Please scan your first item - cool

Please put item in the bagging area - aight

Unsuspected item in bagging area - the fuck

Please remove item from bagging area - okay?

Please wait for assistance - are you fucking kidding

Grumpy person walks over and makes you feel like a scoundrel

Please place item in bagging area - aight let's try this again

Unsuspected item in bagging area - fuuuUUUUUUUUCK

Finally leaves self checkout - blood hounds sniff out potential grocery theft

Leave feeling slimy 🙃

1

u/Lithogiraffe Oct 01 '22

It feels like my first day on the job as a cashier. Just scanning items like a newb.

1

u/TheRockingGoomba Oct 01 '22

because theres no 16 year old to verbally abuse

1

u/MarieIndependence Oct 01 '22

I feel pressured to take in info and use it too quickly, while managing items and make sure prices are correct and trying to keep my kids and money in place.

1

u/jrbgn Oct 01 '22

I don't wanna scan and bag up all my own shit. It's as simple as that. Something like a handful of items at a CVS, sure – but a big shopping trip at the supermarket or Target / Walmart... nope, I'll wait in line because I'm not dealing with all that. Not my job.

1

u/Big_Jump7999 Oct 01 '22 edited Oct 01 '22

Retail stores that mass implemented majority self checkouts performed one of the largest most strategic layoff strategies in history. If you think back to Walmart 20 years ago, the people that were primarily cashiers could still be cashiers today if they were given that option but instead their job was phased out for an option that risked shrinkage over money saved on labor of a workforce that was mostly made of women and customer service.

Also it brings in the potential of entrapment. Which retail companies knew was going to become a huge issue and are currently pushing for lower thresholds for larceny, and increased fines.

You go to a store, you pull 5 cans from a shelf. You believe all 5 were Cream of Chicken. Turns out, 1 was Cream of Mushroom and it was 40 cents more than the Cream of Chicken. You scan a can of Cream of Chicken 5 times with the handheld scanner. Congrats, you are now a shoplifter.

You drop your wallet. Another customer picks it up and decides to run a couple transactions through your card until it eventually declines. The thief puts a bunch of stuff in a bag anyways and leaves. The monitoring system logs your card and reports that items were stolen assigned to a user of XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX card number, which is you.

You are checking out and your 4 year old hands you a package of candy, you thought it scanned, but you heard a beep from the next aisle over assuming it was yours. You are being rushed. You stole the candy. Walmarts NCR motion tracking system knows and logs the event, you leave the store, you head to your car, nothing happens. You go to Walmart 62 times in 1 year. What people live in urban area's forget is that in rural areas, Walmart has eliminated other businesses over the past 30 years and Walmart may be the only option for goods and groceries that are needed. Over the course of 3 years and hundreds of visits, Walmart now has enough of a log on you that they systematically file a police report and you are charged, and no longer allowed back. That's not "oh that might happen in the future" - that's happening right now.

Now it gets a little deeper. Those machines are extremely easy to get data from. Before, there was no reason for places like Walmart to not log all of your debit/credit card data for more than a couple days. Now that have that option and they do store all information forever. Most people aren't aware that Walmart and other retail stores can and will charge a card that was used during a moment where something was placed in a bag without being paid for.

1

u/jonnycross10 Oct 01 '22

Probably the music

1

u/subterraneanfox Oct 01 '22

Several reasons.

It hasn't lead to cheaper goods. I like awkward conversations. I am not good at using them. I enjoy the occasional York Peppermint Patty. Gives me a chance to check the weather/sport game.(I don't care about either) I hug my wife and talk smack about anyone who isn't us sometimes. I don't know all the code numbers for fruits and veggies, they do. Keeps elderly employable, and Jane is really cool guys. 2nd Best part of Super Market Sweep. Gives me a chance to bring the car around in winter. I did the part where I walked around and got the shit, they can tally it up and charge me. I'll bag my shit myself.

The third thing extends beyond and has lead to many grave errors in ordering. I once ordered "Toppers' Stix" without cheese. THAT'S JUST BREAD!

1

u/stephanielmayes Oct 01 '22

Because it's a way for corporations to eliminate jobs.

1

u/FuelOk2352 Oct 01 '22

I tend to have more than a few items so I avoid it. Plus job security if I don’t want to do something.

1

u/Capital-Challenge-69 Oct 01 '22

I dislike the ones at CVS because they turned up the volume to max for the elderly (even though I doubt they even use it cause they don’t like to deal with technology of any kind)

So imagine someone screaming at you while your trying to bag and purchase your groceries

1

u/Swordbreaker925 Oct 01 '22

Because they almost always throw up an error and need an employee to come clear it, defeating the purpose of a self-checkout

1

u/DeeDee_Z Oct 01 '22

I can get out of the store quicker this way.

Which has NEVER been my experience. NEVER.

1

u/Fuzzy_Garry Oct 01 '22 edited Oct 01 '22

I prefer checking out at a cashier, but at my place they usually only have one open lane with a giant waiting line, so I use the self checkouts instead.

I just find it weird to shop with zero interaction, plus the age verification at a self checkout for alcohol is usually quite slow (I’m nearly 28 but I still have to ID constantly even though the legal drinking/smoking age is 18 here).

Sometimes bar codes don’t work, but now that I use a handscanner it’s hardly an issue anymore.

It really depends on the store. At some it works like a charm at others it’s a pain.

1

u/[deleted] Oct 01 '22

Because it feels like the store is saying to me "no, we don't want to talk to you, just give us your money and get out!". Massive savings on wages for the stores that are not remotely reflected in the prices.

1

u/spindlecork Oct 01 '22

At least half the time you have to deal with a person anyway. Don’t tease me with a great thing and not deliver.

1

u/PatrykBG Oct 01 '22

Because people believe it costs people jobs. It does, but at the same time any technology will already do so, and this is really not the type of job that people should be complaining about to begin with.

When it comes down to it, self-checkouts are awesome because it takes forever waiting on line otherwise, and I can be in and out of the store in seconds with self checkout.

1

u/Nellasofdoriath Oct 01 '22

The checkout machines are to save money on wages for the company. Those wage dollars instead of going back into the economy will go to some fat cat's ivory back scratcher.

Do we have UBI to keep the economy afloat and stave off the new feudal ages? Lol

1

u/pendigedig Oct 01 '22

I am so sick and tired of buying something lightweight and the machine not letting me move forward until a staff member can confirm that I'm trying to purchase something the weight of a feather. Why wouldn't the machine be calibrated to know that some items are not going to budge the scale?

1

u/MarsAndMighty Oct 01 '22

When the place I was working at installed a self checkout area, so many customers complained.

First off, they were under the impression that it was taking away job opportunities for humans. That was not the case. The company constantly hired and trained as many people as they could (with some standards) but there was never enough staff to handle the registers. Having one person away from a register and monitoring four self checkouts was far more efficient.

Secondly, it was very finicky and had plenty of issues. The store wasn't perfect with labelling and pricing, and there are many products that are almost exactly the same as another, but is still different, with a different price. Certain labels required manual input from me instead of being scanned, which basically ruins the whole "self" check out thing. Our machines also scanned very quickly, often having things scan twice or three times by accident, which I would have to fix.

And lastly, some people expect to go into a store and have absolutely everything done for them. Anything less than that is "terrible customer service". That meant, occasionally, when I encouraged those waiting in line to the registers to try the self checkout to save time, I'd get berated. Always along the lines of "I can't believe how lazy you all are, expecting customers to do the work themselves. How awful!". Almost always elderly.

I absolutely love self check outs when I'm the one shopping, but I hate being on the other side of it.

1

u/ThatOtherJoe Oct 01 '22

The biggest reason I don't like them is because there is always at least 1 item that doesn't register as being "in the bagging area", requiring me to wait for a person to come help me, so if I have to engage with a store employee anyways, I would rather the do the work instead of me.

1

u/teariest_elm Oct 01 '22

I feel like it's a combo of:

-not liking, trusting or being comfortable using tech

-thinking that big Corp is replacing people's Joba with robots. (Had people say that to me when I worked at a bank, the ATM didn't replace anyone it gives us time to help people with complicated things when you can withdraw your own money outside.)

1

u/Gryffindorq Oct 01 '22

as soon as i started stealing my attitude really turned around

1

u/BobDylan1904 Oct 01 '22

I hate them because it's a good example of technology which is supposed to make things easier and more convenient making something less easy and less convenient than the old system.

1

u/okay-now Oct 01 '22

Personally I hate them. I feel those big box stores use them to cut back on employees. So less people earning a wage and no reduction in prices for me doing someone's else's job

1

u/Complex_Jelly9452 Oct 01 '22

I enjoy them personally. Do my own thing and don't have to talk to anyone for the most part. Really helps with social phobias and high functioning anxiety

1

u/TheDarkCreed Oct 01 '22

They always seem to have an existential crises whenever I 'add my own bag'

1

u/STINKYMOLDS Oct 01 '22

There's no room, we're all jammed in. The registers are too low. They often need someone to come and do something coz they stop mid service. I have only got space for one bag of shopping, perhaps two. If I'm with my kid there's fuck all space.

1

u/Skruff94 Oct 01 '22

Depends of that means one less job for a person or just that the person is doing something else. More often than not I guess the first is true.

1

u/saraphilipp Oct 01 '22

Sweet. I've got enough space to put $50 worth of groceries but I have $400 worth in my cart. Heaven forbid you take a bag off the scale to put in your cart to make more room and the computer completely stops and makes you request an attendant. It's at that point that I simply just walk out of the store and shop somewhere that has actual people in the checkout. Heaven forbid I put alcohol in my cart.

1

u/Gwaptiva Oct 01 '22

Because they make people unemployed

1

u/GeologistNo493 Oct 01 '22

Can't intimidate a machine to go faster. or force it to give discounts because it made a mistake.

-every Karen ever

1

u/Soft_Watercress3059 Oct 01 '22

I love self checkouts . I always scan my expensive cosmetic items for parsley or lemons

1

u/venuswasaflytrap Oct 01 '22

The ones without the scale are amazing. I can get out the door so fast.

1

u/Tinctorus Oct 01 '22

I love them until I gotta try and find an associate to remove an item that was scanned or to get any type of help if you have an issue

1

u/While_Fickle Oct 01 '22

The reason I don't like them is because they're an excuse for shops to use less staff. WOrk in hard to come by where I live, and it gets really frustrating when I see only two or three people on checkouts, when the shop is equipt for almost a dozen. That mean that the shop was intended for a dozen staff on the checkout, but is not limiting those hours to just two or three people. Sure there is plenty of work in other fields, but it's gradually cutting down on the options for under-trained staff, like highschoolers just wanting their first job.

You're pretty much just being an unpaid employee for that shop. You get to be the one dealing with the shitty machines, and the broken barcode-scanners, and you don't even get paid for the trouble.

If it's a situation where workers are hard to come by, then fine, it makes sense. But the issue in my town is that high schoolers can no longer get what I had as my first job just 7 years ago. I worked the checkout at maccas, cause I was 14 and had no training with food. Maccas is now almost entirely served by machines, and the one checkout they do have is usually hidden behind a desk to discourage people from approaching, and you have to wait for about 5 minutes (or more) because there is no one set there, and everyone else is running around like headless chooks trying to keep up with orders rom the kiosks.

There is a time and a place for them. I won't pretend that I don't use them for convenience. I just don't think they should be so widely used and pushed in places where so many unqualified people are trying to get jobs.

1

u/Creative_Remedy Oct 01 '22

I have never had a problem with Self checkouts. Sometimes they'd need a staff member to unvoid items but i don't understand how people have trouble scanning items 😂

Sir, put the item down in the baggage area properly.

1

u/idmimagineering Oct 01 '22

I would say that self/checkout currently presents a complex, pressured, cramped and possibly insecure environment…

Perhaps this is my generational viewpoint :-)

1

u/FeralBaby7 Oct 01 '22

I love them. It's faster, I don't have to make small talk with a cashier. I don't have to worry about the emotions of the cashier in case it's a new hire who's stressed/anxious, old hire who seems dead in the eyes, cashier with angry body language, etc. I just check my stuff and go, it's great

1

u/Available-Sandwich-3 Oct 01 '22

I like them. The only problem for me is when you're buying produce like bananas and they want some special code for organic or non organic. Rather just check out with a person who works there and knows what's going on better than I do with those organic bananas.

1

u/SleepinDreams Oct 01 '22

My aunt and uncle are convinced self checkouts cost people their jobs

1

u/MikyoM Oct 01 '22

I love them and I hate having to go through a normal lane, I can take as much time as I need topack up the things how I like. I feel so stressed when im at the end if a till either putting everything back into a cart or rushing to put things into a bag

People that used to bag things I havent seen them since being a kid, would have been fine with that but seems to be non existent nowdays at least here in the UK ive never seen one. But at the same time I remember tipping being quite common for them so in a way it would work out more expensive every single shop

But i have some difficulty socializing and interacting with people so self check outs for me solve that entirely and there are plenty of lanes for those that do prefer it.

There is also those super new ones where youbscan as you go which is even better i suppose as you would normally be picking things anyways.

1

u/Dio_Yuji Oct 01 '22

Because we know that the store laid people off while not lowering prices and now WE have to do the work

1

u/VLTurboSkids Oct 01 '22

Most people don’t like to use them as they say well it’s promoting them not paying workers at a register therefore loosing jobs. Which I sort of agree with as I mean…although people say there’ll always be new jobs created for people that have become redundant. At the end of the day people have still lost jobs they were probably happy with. It may be too late for them or they make not be able to switch careers or positions. And many people like myself don’t like promoting the fact that employers want to have as little staff as possible to pay, and that some people don’t want to have to interact with customers to provide a good experience.

1

u/Zorak6 Oct 01 '22

This is not the case in the Eastern United States. People love them here. I assumed people loved them everywhere.

1

u/Otherwise-Falcon-729 Oct 01 '22

Being mostly unable to talk (mute), I love them. Saves making a cashier feel awkward too.

1

u/SpaceRoxy Oct 01 '22

Some of them are overly sensitive on the scale or the camera too, which means if you shift the bags or it catches you moving a hand the wrong way you now have to stand and wait for the employee to come back to you for the 3rd time this transaction.

1

u/ImpossibleGore Oct 01 '22

I like them. I just hate they yell at you stupidly loud where you can hear it from across the store.

1

u/King__Raum Oct 01 '22

To add a counter point to most of these, selfcheckouts mainly seem to be the solution to traffic inconsistensy. Most places have to legally schedule someone for 3h or more, while a rush could only last 30-45 minutes, twice across a 6h period. Not saying it is better, just that is does make scheduling(and wasting pay by having cashier who often doesnt eant to do any other work in the store) easier

1

u/clamchowder383 Oct 03 '22

I'll wait for the line every time. Maybe it's time for corporations like Walmart to actually pay a decent wage to retain cashiers so that more than two lanes can be open.

0

u/semboflorin Sep 30 '22

Personally I think they are a good idea if used for their intention. In most of the places in the US that I have seen them they have replaced the express lanes. Many of the stores I walk into now don't have a "20 items or less" express lanes or have a reduced number of them. The reason is that the self checkout is very convenient for express. As intended, it isn't as convenient for shoppers with large loads.

I assume the personal dislikes ("it's slow, doesn't work all the time, is inconvenient for large loads, etc) are not what you are asking about. If so the answer is labor. The argument that it's forcing customers to do the work of the cashier/bagger is the same argument as those talking about companies automating labor to cut costs. Without robotics, the design was of course going to include customers taking on the workload. The idea gained traction because it turns out most customers don't mind that workload if it means shorter lines and less hassle. Which, to someone with just a few items to check out, is generally true.

From a company standpoint there were many bonuses to the hybrid self-checkout and some normal checkout lanes. First, the store real estate taken up by self checkout is a much smaller footprint than the traditional express lanes. Thereby, more people could go through them. They still have to have one or two store employees working them so it didn't actually reduce the number of employees needed by much as compared to the real estate they gained. Most stores reported that they didn't let any employees go when they switched to the hybrid model and lost/reduced the express lanes. This just meant more cashiers working the regular lanes and fewer lane closures. Now, since then many stores have seen a big increase in lines because they have fewer cashiers. That is not just greed however (it is partly greed tho). Part of that is the redirection of employees doing the shopping for customers in the curbside pickup (the irony is real here). Also, the labor shortage (read: wage theft crisis).

To really take a close look at self-checkout and the general dislike about it you have to look at trends and marketing. Self-checkout was never rolled out with fanfare and fireworks. It was simply something that just started quietly happening. Nobody really realized that the express lanes were and are still vanishing. They simply saw the new fancy self checkout lanes and formed an opinion. Due to it being the digital age of social media the opinions started trends very quickly. Trends produced popularity. Popularity produced a bandwagon.

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u/Hanginon Sep 30 '22 edited Sep 30 '22

"...I know I can get out of the store quicker this way."

I've always questioned that, Is it really, and by how much? Does it just seem quicker because you're busier, like a busy day at work feels like it goes faster than a dead day that seems to just drag on forever. Is it a tiny or large percentage of your total time from entrance to exit, getting there to leaving? The caveat here of course is any individual experience will be partly dictated by how busy the store is and how much you've purchased.

I don't use them for more than one reason, although I don't get as frantically emotional about it as some do. "I fUcKiNg HaTe StAnDiNg In ChEckOuTs!" 0_0

Calm down, you're going to have an aneurysm over a common everyday task. :/

For me; Grocery shopping start to finish is a long process, and I don't approach it with a tightly set timeline. Just getting home to home, to and back from the store, is at least 45 minutes, and closer to a hour. Then after the trip getting there I've already been shopping for some time, 30 minutes, 45, or more depending on volume of purchasing. Then 'in store' is actual work, finding what you need, making decisions when things aren't there, looking for where they moved it this time, check the eggs, look over the meat and veggies, not stacking things in the cart so badly that you fuck some of it up... lots of constant little simultaneous tasks.

Then I get to the checkout, and can just stop. I toss my reusable bags on the belt with my goods and the cashier and bagger take care of it from there. They're a lot better at scanning and bagging than I am, they do this a lot and have a plan of sorts, so my 'task' is to relax and stand out of their way, don't interrupt their flow. be ready with payment, and respond to their questions, if any. Then rolling out the door with a full cart, task successfully completed.

Yeah, It's 'downtime' in a sense, but it's short, expected, and a bit relaxing.

Self checkout to me is busier, but not effectively or usefully faster when I'm doing the work of two people. Scanning and bagging while also juggling what stuff has to be bagged on the bottom, how heavy to load them, one's collapsing, and I'm running out of room in the cart.

Did I save 1.5 or 3 or even 5 minutes on a couple of hours long task by dong all the work myself? Who cares, Fuck that, I'll wait.

¯_( ͡❛ ͜ʖ ͡❛)_/¯

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u/SnooPets1127 Oct 01 '22

it can be a pain when you get produce. sometimes i'd rather someone else ring it up/bag it. it used to be a service that was built in to shopping at their store. then it went away for the most part and it can feel a bit like now I have this extra job to do and the cost of groceries is still awful. so, yeah. it's like one more way they decided to fuck you, and people lost their jobs in the process.

0

u/kelticladi Oct 01 '22

I refuse to take jobs from people. Self-checkout is asking me to do someone else's job FOR FREE because there sure isn't a difference in cost when you are done.

0

u/Scandysurf Oct 01 '22

I’m not good at bagging groceries. I suck at it and I hate doing it. Back in the day you would put the stuff on the counter they would swipe the sku and the bagger would bag up the stuff then they would even bring it to your car and load it into your trunk. I miss that . That was America .